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Statistics

33% of women suffer from incontinence.
90% of women can be helped without resorting to surgery.

Bladder Training & Bowel Management

The conservative management of urge incontinence is bladder training. The aim of bladder training is to increase bladder capacity, decrease frequency and control the urgency and maintaining normal bowel function.
For bladder training to be successful it requires a person who is motivated because trying to control and manage urge incontinence is not easy!
This treatment can improve quality of life and increase confidence.

Pelvic Floor Exercises & Education

What are pelvic floor muscles? The floor of the pelvis is made up of layers of muscle and other tissues. These layers stretch like a hammock from the tailbone at the back, to the public bone in front.
A woman’s pelvic floor muscles support her bladder, womb (uterus) and bowel (colon). The urine tube (front passage), the vagina and the back passage all pass through the pelvic floor muscles. Your pelvic floor muscles help you to control your bladder and bowel. They also help sexual function. It is vital to keep your pelvic floor muscles strong.

NeoControl Chair (for Pelvic Floor Strengthening)

The NeoControl chair is a non surgical, non invasive painless treatment of incontinence from a weakened pelvic floor.
The chair is a safe pelvic floor workout. The pelvic floor muscles are stimulated by an Electromagnetic Inductin therapy.
The treatment involves 2 x 20 minute sessions weekly for 8 weeks.

Urodynamic Bladder Studies & Surgery

Surgery is the last option for urinary incontinence. Conservative management such as pelvic floor muscle exercises or bladder retraining should be undertaken first.
Urinary incontinence can be cured by conservative management in a large percentage of people. Of those who are not cured surgery is an option. Careful choice of surgery is necessary and Urodynamic testing with a gynaecologist is used to assess each person individually to ensure the correct surgery is chosen.
The majority of patients will achieve a satisfactory outcome without surgical intervention.

Text Courtesy of Continence Foundation of Australia